Media Literacy Training for Teachers

Media Literacy Training for Teachers

Overview

We offer media literacy training to educators in the United States. The curriculum uses our proven Learn to Discern methodology.

Learn to Discern helps teachers address the problems that students face today, such as navigating social media newsfeeds, determining which sources are reliable, distinguishing between facts and opinions, and becoming better digital citizens.

Unlike traditional approaches to teaching media literacy, Learn to Discern was designed for a polarized, hyperconnected, and impatient world.

Training Options

We offer three customizable training options for teachers who wish to use Learn to Discern in their classrooms.

Introductory session (90 minutes)

  • Information overload: Why everyone is overwhelmed by the newsfeed
  • My media landscape: A tool to evaluate information consumption
  • Emotional manipulation in headlines

Half-day workshop

  • Information overload: Why everyone is overwhelmed by the newsfeed
  • My media landscape: A tool to evaluate information consumption
  • Emotional manipulation in headlines
  • Which is it? News vs. opinion
  • The types of misinformation every student should know
  • Check it out: How to verify information online

Two-day professional learning

  • Information overload: Why everyone is overwhelmed by the newsfeed
  • My media landscape: A tool to evaluate information consumption
  • Emotional manipulation in headlines
  • Which is it? News vs. opinion
  • The types of misinformation every student should know
  • Check it out: How to verify information online
  • New forms of media and changes in traditional media
  • What’s the difference? Propaganda, social advertising, public relations, advertising, and informing
  • Checking your emotions: How media manipulates
  • Spot the manipulation: Photo alteration
  • Fake social media accounts
  • Understanding science and health news
  • Video manipulation (The future: You’re leading the way)

Sample lesson plan:

We look forward to continuing the Learn to Discern curriculum to provide professional development opportunities for our teachers. Betsy Hargrove, superintendent of Avondale Elementary School District

Request Training

Contact us to discuss which option is right for you.

Request a Free Consultation

Previous Webinars

An Introduction to Digital Media Literacy (and Why Your Students Need It)

Do your students struggle with using critical-thinking skills when evaluating news, information, and sources? This video introduces how to help students analyze their own media consumption.

Get the Recording
 

Verification 1.0: How to Help Students Make Sense of What They Read

It’s easy to tell students not to believe everything they read online, but how can we equip them to really make sense of what they read? We review some of the top techniques that you can use in your classroom to help students verify text-based information.

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Verification 2.0: Is Seeing Believing? How to Verify Images in the Age of Fakes

Google, YouTube, and social media feeds are full of images—all communicating ideas, both subtle and overt. Learn about practical ways of helping students verify and understand images.

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Evidence and Results

Learn to Discern has proven effective with students. An evaluation of eighth- and ninth-grade students in 50 schools found that students who were exposed to the curriculum were twice as likely to detect hate speech and 18% better at identifying fake news stories, compared to a control group of their peers. The evaluation was featured in NPR, The New Republic, and The Atlantic.

In contrast, the effects of traditional media literacy programs typically wane after one year, according to prior studies. Traditional approaches have also been criticized for teaching students to use lengthy, outdated checklists instead of teaching students to think like fact-checkers.

Contact

Matt Vanderwerff
Senior Technical Advisor
IREX, 1275 K Street, NW, Suite 600
Washington, DC 20005
mvanderwerff@irex.org