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Paying It Forward: Encouraging Young Entrepreneurs in Nigeria

“We’ve been given [this] opportunity so that we can give opportunities to other people on the continent,” said Temitayo Etomi, reflecting on her 2014 Mandela Washington Fellowship experience. “As we build our networks, we must remember that we’re only a piece in the solution puzzle.” The puzzle Etomi has in mind is Nigeria’s soaring youth unemployment rate. Her method: take the entrepreneurial skills and business knowledge she received in the Fellowship and replicate the experience for aspiring Nigerian entrepreneurs.

“We’ve been given [this] opportunity so that we can give opportunities to other people on the continent,” said Temitayo Etomi, reflecting on her 2014 Mandela Washington Fellowship experience. “As we build our networks, we must remember that we’re only a piece in the solution puzzle.”

Feature Image Caption: 
Temitayo Etomi lectures on Consumer Brands at Nestle through YBLN

Paying It Forward: Encouraging Young Entrepreneurs in Nigeria

“We’ve been given [this] opportunity so that we can give opportunities to other people on the continent,” said Temitayo Etomi, reflecting on her 2014 Mandela Washington Fellowship experience. “As we build our networks, we must remember that we’re only a piece in the solution puzzle.” The puzzle Etomi has in mind is Nigeria’s soaring youth unemployment rate. Her method: take the entrepreneurial skills and business knowledge she received in the Fellowship and replicate the experience for aspiring Nigerian entrepreneurs.

“We’ve been given [this] opportunity so that we can give opportunities to other people on the continent,” said Temitayo Etomi, reflecting on her 2014 Mandela Washington Fellowship experience. “As we build our networks, we must remember that we’re only a piece in the solution puzzle.”

Feature Image Caption: 
Temitayo Etomi lectures on Consumer Brands at Nestle through YBLN

Paying It Forward: Encouraging Young Entrepreneurs in Nigeria

“We’ve been given [this] opportunity so that we can give opportunities to other people on the continent,” said Temitayo Etomi, reflecting on her 2014 Mandela Washington Fellowship experience. “As we build our networks, we must remember that we’re only a piece in the solution puzzle.” The puzzle Etomi has in mind is Nigeria’s soaring youth unemployment rate. Her method: take the entrepreneurial skills and business knowledge she received in the Fellowship and replicate the experience for aspiring Nigerian entrepreneurs.

“We’ve been given [this] opportunity so that we can give opportunities to other people on the continent,” said Temitayo Etomi, reflecting on her 2014 Mandela Washington Fellowship experience. “As we build our networks, we must remember that we’re only a piece in the solution puzzle.”

Feature Image Caption: 
Temitayo Etomi lectures on Consumer Brands at Nestle through YBLN

How to beat the digital divide

Billionaire-genius Elon Musk plans to deploy hundreds of low Earth orbit micro-satellites to connect the world's remaining 4.2 billion people without access to the Internet. A consortium that includes Coca-Cola, Richard Branson's Virgin Group, and other companies is vying to beat him to the punch. Google, meanwhile, is placing its bet on drones and router-touting hot-air balloons to do the job. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (also a billionaire-genius) is exploring innovative high-tech solutions like solar-powered unmanned aircraft, as well as tried-and-true approaches that involve good old-fashioned carrier companies laying fiber-optic cable and setting up cell phone towers.

This article was originally published by CNN.

Billionaire-genius Elon Musk plans to deploy hundreds of low Earth orbit micro-satellites to connect the world's remaining 4.2 billion people without access to the Internet.

Feature Image Caption: 
Photo courtesy of Incubators Youth Outreach Network-Nigeria

How to beat the digital divide

Billionaire-genius Elon Musk plans to deploy hundreds of low Earth orbit micro-satellites to connect the world's remaining 4.2 billion people without access to the Internet. A consortium that includes Coca-Cola, Richard Branson's Virgin Group, and other companies is vying to beat him to the punch. Google, meanwhile, is placing its bet on drones and router-touting hot-air balloons to do the job. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (also a billionaire-genius) is exploring innovative high-tech solutions like solar-powered unmanned aircraft, as well as tried-and-true approaches that involve good old-fashioned carrier companies laying fiber-optic cable and setting up cell phone towers.

This article was originally published by CNN.

Billionaire-genius Elon Musk plans to deploy hundreds of low Earth orbit micro-satellites to connect the world's remaining 4.2 billion people without access to the Internet.

Feature Image Caption: 
Photo courtesy of Incubators Youth Outreach Network-Nigeria

How to beat the digital divide

Billionaire-genius Elon Musk plans to deploy hundreds of low Earth orbit micro-satellites to connect the world's remaining 4.2 billion people without access to the Internet. A consortium that includes Coca-Cola, Richard Branson's Virgin Group, and other companies is vying to beat him to the punch. Google, meanwhile, is placing its bet on drones and router-touting hot-air balloons to do the job. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (also a billionaire-genius) is exploring innovative high-tech solutions like solar-powered unmanned aircraft, as well as tried-and-true approaches that involve good old-fashioned carrier companies laying fiber-optic cable and setting up cell phone towers.

This article was originally published by CNN.

Billionaire-genius Elon Musk plans to deploy hundreds of low Earth orbit micro-satellites to connect the world's remaining 4.2 billion people without access to the Internet.

Feature Image Caption: 
Photo courtesy of Incubators Youth Outreach Network-Nigeria

Who Is Really Putting Nepal Back Together?

More than seven months after a devastating earthquake in Nepal killed almost 9,000 people and left millions in need of food, shelter, and basic medical care, most of the $4 billion committed by international donors has not reached its intended recipients. Children cannot go to school, buildings remain unsafe and harsh winter weather is fast approaching. One need only drive through the Nepali countryside to see that many people in rural areas are still living under makeshift shelters using tarpaulin and sticks. Only the fortunate have tin roofs to help keep out the rain and, soon, the cold winter weather. The situation has only worsened in the past three months due to a nation-wide fuel crisis and political unrest along Nepal’s border with India.

This article was originally published in Foreign Policy.

Feature Image Caption: 
Local villagers in earthquake-hit Chautara in Sindhupalchok District – north east of Kathmandu, Nepal. Photo courtesy of Jessica Lea/DFID through a Creative Commons license.

Who Is Really Putting Nepal Back Together?

More than seven months after a devastating earthquake in Nepal killed almost 9,000 people and left millions in need of food, shelter, and basic medical care, most of the $4 billion committed by international donors has not reached its intended recipients. Children cannot go to school, buildings remain unsafe and harsh winter weather is fast approaching. One need only drive through the Nepali countryside to see that many people in rural areas are still living under makeshift shelters using tarpaulin and sticks. Only the fortunate have tin roofs to help keep out the rain and, soon, the cold winter weather. The situation has only worsened in the past three months due to a nation-wide fuel crisis and political unrest along Nepal’s border with India.

This article was originally published in Foreign Policy.

Feature Image Caption: 
Local villagers in earthquake-hit Chautara in Sindhupalchok District – north east of Kathmandu, Nepal. Photo courtesy of Jessica Lea/DFID through a Creative Commons license.

Who Is Really Putting Nepal Back Together?

More than seven months after a devastating earthquake in Nepal killed almost 9,000 people and left millions in need of food, shelter, and basic medical care, most of the $4 billion committed by international donors has not reached its intended recipients. Children cannot go to school, buildings remain unsafe and harsh winter weather is fast approaching. One need only drive through the Nepali countryside to see that many people in rural areas are still living under makeshift shelters using tarpaulin and sticks. Only the fortunate have tin roofs to help keep out the rain and, soon, the cold winter weather. The situation has only worsened in the past three months due to a nation-wide fuel crisis and political unrest along Nepal’s border with India.

This article was originally published in Foreign Policy.

Feature Image Caption: 
Local villagers in earthquake-hit Chautara in Sindhupalchok District – north east of Kathmandu, Nepal. Photo courtesy of Jessica Lea/DFID through a Creative Commons license.

Who Is Really Putting Nepal Back Together?

More than seven months after a devastating earthquake in Nepal killed almost 9,000 people and left millions in need of food, shelter, and basic medical care, most of the $4 billion committed by international donors has not reached its intended recipients. Children cannot go to school, buildings remain unsafe and harsh winter weather is fast approaching. One need only drive through the Nepali countryside to see that many people in rural areas are still living under makeshift shelters using tarpaulin and sticks. Only the fortunate have tin roofs to help keep out the rain and, soon, the cold winter weather. The situation has only worsened in the past three months due to a nation-wide fuel crisis and political unrest along Nepal’s border with India.

This article was originally published in Foreign Policy.

Feature Image Caption: 
Local villagers in earthquake-hit Chautara in Sindhupalchok District – north east of Kathmandu, Nepal. Photo courtesy of Jessica Lea/DFID through a Creative Commons license.
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